Jon Ormesher has been doing monitors for nearly 35 years. He’s worked with a staggering variety of music and  situations. From TV to Arenas Jon has seen it all.

Most recently he’s been doing monitors for the amazing Florence and the Machine.

We caught up with Jon while he was on the road on the summer festival circuit after a triumphant Glastonbury performance where Florence and the Machine filled in for the recently injured Dave Grohl.

Technology wise, How has doing monitors changed for you, over the years?

Well digital desks, IEM’s and much better wedges have made a massive difference to my working day. It also means you can tour the world and faithfully reproduce what you had on the previous show. Having all of a band on IEM’s does produce some “ problems “ in that you now need to have mixes for the backline crew as well as for each band member. This can bring your total mix output up to levels previously unheard of. Like 30 or so stereo mixes.

What got you involved with using Ultimate Ears?

I have been using IEM’s since Chris Lyndrop developed the Garwood system. In those days we just used Sony ear buds in a plastic generic mold. Over the years UE’s and others have made massive strides in the development of personalized ear molds. This has made the use of IEM’s a lot better in the audio reproduction. UE has always been a name you can trust and has excellent back up, which you need in the live world. They provide excellent aural reproduction of the mix I send.

As far as musicians are concerned can you tell us some thoughts about using IEMS vs. Wedges?

Some musicians are put off using IEM’s as they worry they will feel “ cut off “ from an audience, also they are just plain used to wedges. There are ways around these worries. Sometimes, however, they will just never go on to IEM’s. It’s their choice.

Read the full interview here:

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